The Little Benefits of Vulnerability

Creating good connections requires a certain level of selective vulnerability. Basically you have to let the other person see into some portion of your life so they can get to know you as a person rather than a position. Sometimes just revealing a little about something personal such as your likes and dislikes can reap unexpected returns.

A couple of years ago, when I first became a co-chair for the Leadership Ann Arbor program, I rode up to the opening retreat with the program director, my good friend Lindsay McCarthy. We talked about a wide variety of topics including the kinds of food we like. She knew I was a vegetarian, but hadn’t realized that one of the few vegetables I really detest is eggplant.  Apparently the vegetarian option at dinner the next night was eggplant parmesan.

After Lindsay found out about my dislike for the purple vegetable, she made a special call (without telling me) to make sure I had something else for dinner. What a wonderful surprise when the waiter placed a remarkably tasty pasta with morel mushroom sauce in front of me.

Even the meat-eaters were eyeing my plate with envy.

So, let this be a lesson to those who want to play their cards close to the vest. Sometimes a little openness can lead to a wonderfully tasty result. Yum!

Photo credit: woodleywonderworks

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About Greg Peters

Greg Peters, president and founder of The Reluctant Networker, LLC, is a business networking specialist. He works with trade associations on both the local and national level to create a culture of better connections and greater opportunity. Find out more at www.TheReluctantNetworker.com or gpeters@thereluctantnetworker.com.

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